Tag Archives: new york

Comedians

‘Marx Brothers’, five 20th-century ‘American’ comedians, born in ‘New York City’. The brothers were known by their professional names: ‘Chico Marx’ (born Leonard, 1891-1961), ‘Gummo Marx’ (Milton, 1892-1977), ‘Harpo Marx’ (Adolph, also known as Arthur, 1893-1964), ‘Groucho Marx’ (Julius, 1895-1977), and ‘Zeppo Marx’ (Herbert, 1901-1979).

The ‘Marx’ brothers began their careers in vaudeville as the ‘Nightingales’. Later the four oldest brothers appeared with their mother and aunt as the ‘Six Mascots’, then billed themselves as the ‘Marx Brothers’. (Zeppo, the youngest, replaced ‘Gummo’ in the act before the group became stars on ‘Broadway’ and in motion pictures). The brothers appeared in a number of film comedies noted chiefly for their zany sight gags. Such films include ‘Animal Crackers’ (1930), ‘Horse Feathers’ (1932), and ‘Duck Soup’ (1933). After ‘Zeppo’ retired in (1933), ‘Harpo’, ‘Chico’, and ‘Groucho’ appeared with great success in ‘A Night at the Opera’ (1935), ‘A Day at the Races’ (1937), and ‘Room Service’ (1938). Their last film as a team was ‘Love Happy’ (1950).

Each brother had readily identifiable characteristics. For example, ‘Groucho’ had a caustic wit and usually appeared with a cigar and mustache; ‘Chico’ spoke in an ‘Italian’ accent and played the piano; ‘Harpo’ communicated in pantomime and played the harp.

After the brothers ceased making films, ‘Groucho’ continued his entertainment career as master of ceremonies of the television series ‘You Bet Your Life’. He wrote the autobiographical ‘Groucho and Me’ (1959) and ‘Memoirs of a Mangy Lover’ (1964). ‘Harpo’ published his autobiography, ‘Harpo Speaks’, in (1961). The brothers inspired the musical ‘Minnie Boys’ (1970), which was coauthored by ‘Groucho’ son ‘Arthur’.

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Underground

The ‘September 11 Museum’ was dedicated on May 15 (2014). and opened to the public on May 21. Its exhibits include 23,000 images, 10,300 artifacts, nearly 2,000 oral histories of those killed – mostly provided by friends and families – and over 500 hours of video.

The underground museum has artifacts from ‘September 11’ (2001), including steel from the ‘Twin Towers’ (such as the final steel, the last piece of steel to leave Ground Zero in May 2002). It is built at the former location of Fritz Koenig ‘The Sphere’, a large metallic sculpture placed in the middle of a large pool between the ‘Twin Towers’. Battered but intact after the attacks, ‘The Sphere’ was moved to be displayed at ‘Battery Park’. In December (2011), museum construction halted temporarily due, according to the ‘Associated Press’, to disputes between the ‘Port Authority’ of ‘New York’ and ‘New Jersey’ and the ‘National September 11 Memorial and Museum Foundation’ over responsibility for infrastructure costs.

On March 13 (2012), talks on the issue began and construction resumed. After a number of false opening reports, it was announced that the museum would open to the public on May 21 (2014). The museum was dedicated on May 15 (2014). In attendance were a range of dignitaries, from ‘President Barack Obama’, former ‘President Bill Clinton’, former ‘Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’ and ‘New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’ to former mayors ‘David Dinkins’, ‘Rudy Giuliani’ and ‘Michael Bloomberg’ and current mayor ‘Bill de Blasio’. During the hour-long ceremony LaChanze sang “Amazing Grace”, which she dedicated to her husband (who was killed in the World Trade Center that day).

During the five days between its dedication and the public opening, over 42,000 first responders and family members of ‘9/11’ victims visited the museum. An opening ceremony for the museum was held on May 21, during which twenty-four police officers and firefighters unfurled the restored 30-foot (9.1 m) national ‘9/11’ flag before it was brought into the museum for permanent display. The gates surrounding the museum were then taken down, marking their first removal since the attacks. Opening-day tickets quickly sold out. Despite the museum’s design (to evoke memories without additional distress), counselors were available during its opening due to the large number of visitors.