Tag Archives: holiday

Presidents Day

The federal holiday honoring ‘George Washington’ was originally implemented by an ‘Act of Congress’ in (1879) for government offices in ‘Washington’ and expanded in (1885) to include all federal offices. As the first federal holiday to honor an ‘American President’, the holiday was celebrated on ‘Washington’ actual birthday, February 22. On January 1, (1971), the federal holiday was shifted to the third Monday in February by the ‘Uniform Monday Holiday Act’. This date places it between February 15 and 21, which makes the name “Washington’s Birthday” in some sense a misnomer, since it never occurs on ‘Washington’ actual birthday, either February 11 or February 22.

Today, the February holiday has become well known for being a day in which many stores, especially car dealers, hold sales. Until the late (1980), corporate businesses generally closed on this day, similar to present corporate practices on ‘Memorial Day’ or ‘Christmas Day’. With the late (1980) advertising push to rename the holiday, more and more businesses are staying open on the holiday each year, and, as on ‘Veterans Day’ and ‘Columbus Day’, most delivery services outside of the ‘United States Postal Service’ now offer regular service on the day as well. Some public transit systems have also gone to regular schedules on the day. Many colleges and universities hold regular classes and operations on ‘Presidents Day’.

Various theories exist for this, one accepted reason being to make up for the growing trend of corporations to close in observance of the ‘Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.’ Conversely, many schools and business formerly open on this day began closing after the observance of ‘Dr. King’ birthday holiday became prevalent. This was done in order not to diminish ‘Washington’ birthday in comparison to ‘King’. However, when reviewing the ‘Uniform Monday Holiday Bill’ debate of (1968) in the ‘Congressional Record’, one notes that supporters of the ‘Bill’ were intent on moving federal holidays to Mondays to promote business.

Both ‘Lincoln’ and ‘Washington’ birthdays are in February. In historical rankings of ‘Presidents of the United States’ both ‘Lincoln’ and ‘Washington’ are frequently, but not always, the top two presidents.

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Plymouth Settlers

‘Thanksgiving’ is a holiday celebrated in the ‘United States’ on the fourth thursday in November. It became an official federal holiday in (1863), when, during the ‘Civil War’, President ‘Abraham Lincoln’ proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens”.

Also, there are reports that the original ‘Thanksgiving’ proclamation was signed by ‘George Washington’. As a federal and public holiday in the ‘United States’. ‘Thanksgiving’ is one of the major holidays of the year. Together with ‘Christmas’ and ‘New Year’, ‘Thanksgiving’ is a part of the broader holiday season.

‘Americans’ commonly trace the ‘Thanksgiving’ holiday to a (1621) celebration at the ‘Plymouth Plantation’, where the ‘Plymouth’ settlers held a harvest feast after a successful growing season. Autumn or early winter feasts continued sporadically in later years, first as an impromptu religious observance, and later as a civil tradition.

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1919 / Nov. 11

‘Veterans Day’ is an official ‘United States’ holiday that honors people who have served in the ‘U.S. Armed Forces’. It is a federal holiday that is observed on November 11.

‘Veterans Day’ celebrates the service of all ‘U.S. military’ veterans. U.S. President ‘Woodrow Wilson’ first proclaimed ‘Armistice Day’ for November 11 (1919). The ‘United States Congress’ passed a concurrent resolution seven years later on June 4 (1926), requesting that President ‘Calvin Coolidge’ issue another proclamation to observe November 11 with appropriate ceremonies.

In (1945), ‘World War II’ veteran ‘Raymond Weeks’ from ‘Birmingham’, ‘Alabama’, had the idea to expand ‘Armistice Day’ to celebrate all veterans, not just those who died in ‘World War I’. Weeks led a delegation to Gen. ‘Dwight Eisenhower’, who supported the idea of ‘National Veterans Day’. Weeks led the first national celebration in (1947) in ‘Alabama’ and annually until his death in (1985).

President ‘Reagan’ honored ‘Weeks’ at the ‘White House’ with the ‘Presidential Citizenship Medal’ in (1982) as the driving force for the national holiday. ‘Elizabeth Dole’, who prepared the briefing for President ‘Reagan’, determined ‘Weeks’ as the “Father of Veterans Day”. U.S. Representative ‘Ed Rees’ from ‘Emporia’, ‘Kansas’, presented a bill establishing the holiday through Congress.

President ‘Dwight D. Eisenhower’, also from ‘Kansas’, signed the bill into law on May 26 (1954). Congress amended this act on June 1 (1954), replacing “Armistice” with “Veterans” and it has been known as ‘Veterans Day’ since. ‘The National Veterans Award’, created (1954), also started in ‘Birmingham’.

Congressman ‘Rees’ of ‘Kansas’ was honored in ‘Alabama’ as the first recipient of the award for his support offering legislation to make ‘Veterans Day’ a federal holiday.

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Independence

‘Independence Day’ known as the ‘Fourth of July’, is a federal holiday in the ‘United States of America’ commemorating the adoption of the ‘Declaration of Independence’ on (1776).

‘Independence Day’ is commonly associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts, baseball games, family reunions, and political speeches and ceremonies, in addition to various other public and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the ‘United States’.

Families often celebrate ‘Independence Day’ by hosting or attending a picnic or barbecue and take advantage of the day off and, in some years, long weekend to gather with relatives. Decorations are generally colored red, white, and blue, the colors of the American flag.

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We Under The Flag

‘Flag Day’ is celebrated on June 14. It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the ‘United States’, which happened on that day in (1777) by resolution of the ‘Second Continental Congress’. In (1916), President ‘Woodrow Wilson’ issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as ‘Flag Day’; in August (1949), ‘National Flag Day’ was established by an ‘Act of Congress’.

On June 14, (1937), Pennsylvania became the first (and only) ‘United States’ state to celebrate ‘Flag Day’ as a state holiday, beginning in the town of ‘Rennerdale’. ‘New York Statutes’ designate the second Sunday in June as ‘Flag Day’, a state holiday.

The week of June 14 is designated as “National Flag Week.” During ‘National Flag Week’, the president will issue a proclamation urging ‘United States’ citizens to fly the ‘American’ flag for the duration of that week. The flag should also be displayed on all government buildings.

Some organizations hold parades and events in celebration of ‘America’ national flag and everything it represents. The ‘National Flag Day Foundation’ holds an annual observance for ‘Flag Day’ on the second Sunday in June. The program includes a ceremonial raising of the flag, recitation of the ‘Pledge of Allegiance’, singing of the national anthem, a parade and more.

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Not Make It Home

A ‘United States’ federal holiday which is celebrated every year remembering the men and women who died while serving in the ‘United States Armed Forces’.

Many volunteers place an ‘American flag’ on each grave in national cemeteries, in (1906) that the first ‘Civil War’ soldier’s grave ever decorated was in ‘Warrenton’, ‘Virginia’, on June 3 (1861), implying the first ‘Memorial Day’ occurred there.

On ‘Memorial Day’, the flag of the ‘United States’ is raised briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lowered to the half-staff position, where it remains only until noon, the half-staff position remembers the more than one million men and women who gave their lives in service of their country.

One of the longest-standing traditions is the running of the ‘Indianapolis 500’, an auto race which has been held in conjunction with ‘Memorial Day’ since (1911).

And for many Americans, the central event is attending one of the thousands of parades held on ‘Memorial Day’ in large and small cities all over the country.