Tag Archives: editor

The First American

‘Benjamin Franklin’ born in (1706) was one of the ‘Founding Fathers’ of the ‘United States’ and in many ways was “The First American”. ‘Franklin’ was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat.

As a scientist, he was a major figure in the ‘American Enlightenment’ and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity.

‘Franklin’ earned the title of “The First American” for his early and indefatigable campaigning for colonial unity; as an author and spokesman in London for several colonies, then as the first ‘United States’ ‘Ambassador’ to ‘France’, he exemplified the emerging ‘American’ nation.

‘Franklin’, always proud of his working class roots, became a successful newspaper editor and printer in ‘Philadelphia’, the leading city in the colonies.

With two partners he published the ‘Pennsylvania Chronicle’, a newspaper that was known for its revolutionary sentiments and criticisms of the ‘British’ policies.

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Norma Jean

‘Marilyn Monroe’ born in (1926) was an actress, model, and singer, who became a major sex symbol, starring in a number of commercially successful motion pictures during the (1950) and early (1960). ‘Monroe’ began a career as a model, which led to a film contract in (1946) with ‘Twentieth Century-Fox’.

‘Norma Jeane’ became one of ‘Blue Book’ most successful models; she appeared on dozens of magazine covers. Her successful modeling career brought her to the attention of ‘Ben Lyon’, a ’20th Century Fox’ executive, who arranged a screen test for her. ‘Lyon’ was impressed and commented, “It’s Jean Harlow all over again.” During her first few months at ’20th Century Fox’, ‘Monroe’ had no speaking roles in any films but, alongside other new contract players, took singing, dancing and other classes.

In (1947), ‘Monroe’ had been released from her contract with ’20th Century Fox’. She then met with ‘Hollywood’ pin-up photographer ‘Bruno Bernard’, who photographed her at the ‘Racquet Club of Palm Springs’; and it was at the ‘Racquet Club’ where she met ‘Hollywood’ talent agent ‘Johnny Hyde’. ‘Monroe’ signed in (1948) a six-month contract with ‘Columbia Pictures’ and was introduced to the studio head drama coach ‘Natasha Lytess’, who became her acting coach for several years.

‘Monroe’ faced in March (1952) a possible scandal when two of her nude photos from her (1949) session with photographer ‘Tom Kelley’ were featured on calendars. The press speculated about the identity of the anonymous model and commented that she closely resembled ‘Monroe’. As the studio discussed how to deal with the problem, ‘Monroe’ suggested that she should simply admit that she had posed for the photographs but emphasize that she had done so only because she had no money to pay her rent. She gave an interview in which she discussed the circumstances that led to her posing for the photographs, and the resulting publicity elicited a degree of sympathy for her plight as a struggling actress.

Of these photographs was published in the first issue of ‘Playboy’ in December (1953), making ‘Marilyn’ the first ‘Playmate’ of the Month. ‘Playboy’ editor ‘Hugh Hefner’ chose what he deemed the “sexiest” image, a previously unused nude study of ‘Marilyn’ stretched with an upraised arm on a red velvet background from (1949). The heavy promotion centered around ‘Marilyn’ nudity on the already famous calendar, together with the tease marketing, made the new ‘Playboy’ magazine a success.


Pinky Bly

‘Nellie Bly’ was the pen name of journalist ‘Elizabeth Jane Cochrane’ born in ‘Cochran Mills’ (1864), today part of the ‘Pittsburgh’ suburb of ‘Burrell Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania’.

She was a ground-breaking reporter known for a record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, in emulation of ‘Jules Verne’ fictional character ‘Phileas Fogg’.

In (1880), ‘Cochrane’ and her family moved to ‘Pittsburgh’. An aggressively misogynistic column titled “What Girls Are Good For” in the ‘Pittsburgh Dispatch’ prompted her to write a fiery rebuttal to the editor under the pseudonym “Lonely Orphan Girl”.

As a writer, ‘Bly’ focused her early work for the ‘Dispatch’ on the plight of working women, writing a series of investigative articles on female factory workers. But editorial pressure pushed her to the so-called “women’s pages” to cover fashion, society, and gardening, the usual role for female journalists of the day.

In (1888), ‘Bly’ suggested to her editor at the ‘New York World’ that she take a trip around the world, attempting to turn the fictional “Around the World in Eighty Days” into fact for the first time.

In (1895) ‘Nellie Bly’ married millionaire manufacturer ‘Robert Seaman’, who was 40 years her senior. She retired from journalism, and became the president of the ‘Iron Clad Manufacturing Co.’, which made steel containers such as milk cans and boilers.